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Sooty, the Chimney Swift

So, the big question is…. Is a Chimney Swift a swallow? Even Peter thinks that Sooty, the Chimney Swift, is a swallow, but he isn’t! Burgess lets Jenny Wren answers our question, “He hasn’t any one nearer than some sort of second cousins, Boomer the Nighthawk, Whippoorwill, and Hummer the Hummingbird” (Burgess Bird Book, Living Press Edition, p.75). Wow, that’s really interesting!


Cornell Lab’s Allaboutbirds calls the Chimney Swift “a bird best identified by silohette.” With a short body and tail and curved wings, the Chimney Swift flies high above gliding it’s way through the air.

Form 1, Grade 3 Student

Chimney Swifts use small sticks and saliva to build their nests onto the side of chimneys or in hollow trees. They gather the sticks for their nest while in flight, bathe in flight, and rarely rest. Most birds will perch on a tree branch, the chimney swift uses his tail feathers to hold onto the side of a chimney or tree in order to rest.

Let’s hear a little more about Chimney Swifts from this awesome video from Birds Canada:

I love finding and sharing such wonderful birding resources. Until next time, keep birding! <3 Kate

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